Tony Morgan

Learning From Other Leaders – Questions For Church Leaders

One of the things that voracious learners do, is to find and follow closely trusted and proven leaders who are both older and younger, than themselves. (At this point, the second part is easy for me!)

It also helps when you find other leaders who have similar values, priorities and goals as you do. At times, I don’t mind reading things from folks that see the Kingdom differently, but when you get too much of that, you rarely move your own vision ahead.

Here’s a recent post from Tony Morgan, a younger leader who is ‘down to earth’; but creative and hungry to do the will of God. I found these questions were thoughtful, if not profound.

Fear Affects Leadership Decisions

An Amazing Act Of The Imagination

In a recent TED talk, best-selling author Karen Thompson Walker gave an insightful presentation on fear. What stuck in my mind was a simple comparison that she made. She encouraged the audience to think of fear in a new way. She asked them to think of fear as an “amazing act of the imagination.” She asked them to think of fear as nothing more than a story of one potential outcome among many.

I love this! All of us find ourselves in situations where fear rises up within us. But what would happen if you re-imagined the storyline that your fear is trying to convince you of and adopted a different posture? How many outcomes would be changed if you approached each situation from a different starting stance?…

READ MORE

Proverbs 18 Learning

Leaders Must Be Voracious Learners

The word voracious has been defined as “devouring in great quantities.” We have all met voracious eaters—people who devour food in great quantities. You may have one living in your house. A voracious learner is one who devours knowledge and wisdom in great quantities.

“Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance.”
Proverbs 1:5 (NIV)

It is so easy to get sidetracked and replace learning with entertainment. I’ve been watching a show on the Discovery Channel, called Gold Rush, about a bunch of guys who dig dirt in Alaska, run it through a “wash plant,” and hope to capture some gold from the dirt. Every episode is the same: “Let’s get some more dirt.”—“Good idea, but the wash plant is broken.”—“Let’s fix it and maybe we’ll find some gold.”—“Yeah that would be great.”

There are hundreds, if not thousands of shows like Gold Rush on TV. I don’t watch it to learn something; I am never going to move to Alaska to become a gold miner. I watch it just to be entertained. But a leader must ask, “What percentage of my available time is spent pursuing entertainment?” If that percentage is too high it will definitely sidetrack you from being a lifelong voracious learner….

READ MORE